International Health Care Statistics

Color Coding Key
GREEN Ranked 1st for statistic
RED Ranked last for statistic

The health care page compares each country’s health system noting that the United States has one of the world’s worst health systems according to the World Health Organization yet spends the most money among the nations compared.

  Health care as a percent of GDP Spending per capita, US dollars, 2016 Universal Health Coverage Physicians/ 1000 persons Year Access to Health Care
    Total Public Private        
Australia 9.6 $4,708 $3,190 $1,518 yes 3.37 2013 20.0
Canada 10.3 $4,644 $3,249 $1,395 yes 2.48 2012 40.0
Denmark 10.4 $5,199 $4,374 $826 yes 3.65 2013 40.0
France 11.0 $4,600 $3,626 $974 yes 3.23 2015 39.8
Germany 11.3 $5,551 $4,695 $856 yes 4.13 2014 27.6
Italy 8.9 $3,391 $2,545 $847 yes 3.95 2014 40.0
Japan 10.9 $4,519 $3,801 $718 yes 2.30 2012 20.0
Netherlands 10.5 $5,385 $4,354 $1,032 yes 3.35 2014 28.8
Norway 10.5 $6,648 $5,664 $983 yes 4.42 2014 60.0
Sweden 11.0 $5,488 $4,603 $884 yes 4.11 2013 50.0
United Kingdom 9.7 $4,193 $3,320 $872 yes 2.81 2015 60.0
United States 17.2 $9,892 $4,860 $5,032 no 2.55 2013 9.0

Sources:

View OECD health statistics

Spending per capita:

Universal health coverage: View Universal Health Care Coverage

Access to Health Care Index Score: Decommodification Index Score: Bambra and Backfield "Health care decommodification is 'the extent to which an individual's access to health care is dependent upon their market position and the extent to which a country's provision of health care is independent from the market.'" For 2012.

View WHO statistics

World Health Organization. Physician density per 1,000 people.

Notes:

"How Many Die From Medical Mistakes in U.S. Hospitals?" Marshall Allen

September 19, 2013. New estimates in a report from the Journal of Patient Safety say that 200,000-400,000 patients die every year from medical care mistakes in United States hospitals. If estimates are correct, medical errors would be the third leading cause of death in the United States.

 

Needed:

Number uninsured or uncovered; number below poverty line not covered

Administrative costs as a percent of health care costs.

Cost of pharmaceutical drugs

Preventive care

Care for chronic diseases

Some technology and research indicator, where the US seems to be way ahead.